9 Mouthwatering Local Soups from Singapore

Soups in Singapore are renowned for their genuine flavor since they are prepared using a wide range of fresh herbs and spices.

During the cooler months, Singaporeans love to warm up with a bowl of soup. Noodles, pork, tofu, and veggies are just some of the things that get thrown into the soup processor.

Here are Nine of Singapore’s most beloved soups, all of which are readily available from restaurants and even street vendors because of their appealing appearance and convenient accessibility.

Sup Kambing (Mutton Soup)

Goat soup is prepared differently in every Southeast Asian country, from Singapore to Indonesia to Malaysia.

Mutton or lamb is perfectly OK to use in Singapore’s take on the classic soup, and the offal and bones are typically included in the final dish.

Mutton is prepared by boiling it in a liquid flavored with spices such as coriander, cinnamon, cumin, black pepper, cloves, and cardamom.

Once the mutton soup is ready, it is poured into a dish and topped with fried onions. There is a large Muslim population in Singapore, and they love this meal.

Sliced Fish Soup

One of Singapore’s signature dishes is a fish soup called sliced fish soup. Grouper, sesame oil, cornstarch, pig mince, cabbage, tofu, tomatoes, fish stock, white pepper,salt, soy sauce, and Shaoxing wine are typical ingredients.

Soup is made by first marinating the fish and meat, then cooking them in a skillet with the veggies and seasonings. You may also add cooked noodles to the soup if you like. The Teochew people are credited with creating the sliced fish soup that is sold at hawker places all around the country.

Crab bee hoon soup

Crab bee hoon soup is an essential Singaporean meal for any crab meat lover. This meal has a reputation for being extremely tasty.

Crab bee hoon soup is a hearty dish that has a chicken broth seasoned with white pepper, ginger, garlic, Chinese wine, fish sauce, and oyster sauce. Pieces of Sri Lankan mud crab are used for the dish.

Vermicelli noodles and a wide variety of veggies are the perfect complements to a bowl of crab bee hoon soup.

Bak kut teh

This robust meal may have its origins in the Chinese culinary heritage, but it is more commonly identified with Malaysia and Singapore than with China. In its most basic form, it is made with different pieces of pork simmered in a broth flavored with star anise, cinnamon, garlic, and fennel.

Tofu puffs and mushrooms are regular additions, and it’s typically served with a variety of sauces.

There are several legends surrounding the dish’s inception, but the one with the greatest credence is that an immigrant from Fujian named Lee Boon Teh was the first to sell it in Klang, the city widely acknowledged as the birthplace of genuine bak kut teh.

Curry Laksa

Thai-inspired soup Curry Laksa

Singapore is home to a number of different types of laksa, including curry laksa. There are elements of Chinese, Indian, and Malay cooking in here.

Like regular curry sauce, curry laksa is fragrant and has a robust taste, but its consistency is thinner.

Noodles, tofu puffs, prawns, and fishcakes make up the stuffing. In the classic curry laksa recipe, raw clams are included. Sauces such as chili sauce, soy sauce, and hot sauce can be added to the soup to improve its flavor.

Fish soup bee hoon

Bee hoon noodles (rice vermicelli), fried or boiled fish heads or fish slices, mustard greens, and a delicious fish broth enhanced with milk and spices are the major components of this traditional Singaporean soup.

The most popular fish used in this meal are garoupa, snakehead, pomfret, and batang, while brandy or rice wine are sometimes added to the fish stock to add taste.

Traditionally, fresh scallions are used to garnish this robust soup, making it a traditional hawker meal. CNN included this soup on a list of 40 must-eats when in Singapore back in 2010.

Katong laksa

Spicy, flavorful, and full-bodied tastes are what set Katong laksa apart. Noodles, shrimp, clams, and tofu are just a few of the ingredients in this recipe. Coconut milk is combined with dried shrimp and unique spices to create the Katong laksa soup.

Katong laksa, as its name suggests, is a specialty dish from the Katong district in central Singapore. The Ng brothers of the Marine Parade booth in Hong Kong launched it in 1963.

Shredded Chicken Noodles

Chicken noodle soup with shredded chicken is a popular hawker food in Singapore.

Shredded Chicken Noodles White Ceramic Bowl with Noodle and Chicken

Shaoxing wine, sugar, cornflour, chicken, Egg noodles, mushrooms,   chicken stock, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and green leafy vegetables like spinach are typical ingredients.

After being braised in the stock, the chicken is removed and left aside. To the same pot with the mushrooms go cornflour, soy sauce, oyster sauce, wine, and sugar. In this recipe, shredded chicken is mixed with cooked noodles and veggies.

Guests should expect to receive this noodle soup when it is still steaming hot.

Chinese herbal soup

Chinese herbal soup, which is produced from fresh herbs and has no artificial flavors or preservatives, is not only tasty but also extremely healthy.

There are a number of other soups that contain Chinese medicinal ingredients, but ginseng chicken soup is by far the most well-known. But if you’re feeling under the weather, a bowl of heat-relieving lotus pork soup should do the trick.

When it becomes cold in Singapore, many people turn to a warming bowl of Chinese herbal soup.

Those are just a few of the delicious soups that can be found in Singapore. In Singapore, you may find all of the aforementioned foods in any number of restaurants or even at roadside kiosks.

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Daniel Wong
Daniel Wong
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